Best view of Edinburgh

Best view of Edinburgh

Best views of Edinburgh

My favourite walk with the best view

Best view of Edinburgh

You might have realised from the previous posts I’ve written about Arthur’s Seat that it’s one of my favourite spots in the city. I am firmly of opinion that it offers THE best view of the city. It’s a bit of a workout to get to the top, but those 30 sweaty minutes to get here are beyond worth it.

Whenever someone visits me I ALWAYS take them up Arthur’s Seat. Because you simply can’t visit Edinburg and not go up Arthur’s Seat or the Salisbury Crags. So when friends were visiting the city, I took it as a perfect excuse to take them up Arthur’s Seat (and my camera in tow).

In this post I’ll highlight some of my favourite shots during one of my walks on Arthur’s Seat and explain why they’re my favourites. I’ve also added a little gallery at the end so you can flip through the rest of the photo series.

Sea of Yellow

Once you gain a little altitute going up Arthur’s Seat, the beautiful skyline of Edinburgh starts appearing. I love this picture because it shows that first glimpse of the beauiful view that’s to come if you keep going. All that scotch broom looks like a sea of yellow framing the city, with the actual sea making an appearance just behind it.

The first thing I usually do when I get to this point is looking behind me (and taking a little breather) and you can see why. Especially on a clear day you can see so far.  

The Salisbury Crags

Right next to Arthur’s Seat you’ll find the Salisbury Crag’s. That massive piece of rock which my sister jokingly calls it the shark fin (you’ll know what she means when you see it). This walk is not as steep, nor as high up as Arthur’s Seat. The view is no less spectacular though! 

Holyrood Palace

What I like so much about the Salisbury Crags is that the incline is less steap, slowly revealing more and more of the Edinburgh. This picture was taken after about ten minutes of walking, not even halfway up. It shows off Holyrood Palace, amidst green, with the rest of the city and sea behind it. 

Can you tell that I love those yellow colours from the scotch broom? I’m pretty sure that yellow makes an appearance in almost every picture I took. 

And those were my favourite two pictures! As always, I’ve included some more pictures in the photo gallery below. Click the images if you wish to see them in a larger format. They show some more city scapes, as well as Arthur’s Seat and the Salisbury Crags itself. I hope you liked this new photo series! Do let me know your thoughts in a comment (below)! 

Photo Gallery 

Once Upon a Book Club – March

Once Upon a Book Club – March

Once Upon a Book Club

March

Once upon a time, there was a group of women studying publishing in Edinburgh, Scotland. Neither of them was originally from the country, but they all had something in common: they had a fondness for romance novels. And so it happened, that when they crossed paths, it did not take long before a book club was formed.

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne

Apologies for the extreme delay in posting the March book club discussion. ‘Eat Train Read’ switched hosts, and unfortunately experienced some issues during the move. But we’re back! And with a brand new look!
For March we decided to read the latest release by one of our favourite romance authors: Sally Thorne. We all read (and loved) Sally Thorne’s debut The Hating Game, and were really excited to read 99 Percent Mine as this month’s book club pick.

Be advised that this post might contain spoilers! We discuss various aspects of the book(s) and although we try to avoid spoilers, some aspects cannot be discussed without mentioning parts of what happened in the book.

Once Upon a Book Club – March99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne
Published by William Morrow Paperbacks on January 29th 2019
Genres: Love & Romance
Pages: 368
Buy on Bol.comBuy on Book Depository
Goodreads
five-stars

Darcy Barrett has undertaken a global survey of men. She’s travelled the world, and can categorically say that no one measures up to Tom Valeska, whose only flaw is that Darcy’s twin brother Jamie saw him first and claimed him forever as his best friend. Despite Darcy’s best efforts, Tom’s off limits and loyal to her brother, 99%. That’s the problem with finding her dream man at age eight and peaking in her photography career at age twenty—ever since, she’s had to learn to settle for good enough.

When Darcy and Jamie inherit a tumble-down cottage from their grandmother, they’re left with strict instructions to bring it back to its former glory and sell the property. Darcy plans to be in an aisle seat halfway across the ocean as soon as the renovations start, but before she can cut and run, she finds a familiar face on her porch: house-flipper extraordinaire Tom’s arrived, he’s bearing power tools, and he’s single for the first time in almost a decade.

Suddenly Darcy’s considering sticking around to make sure her twin doesn’t ruin the cottage’s inherent magic with his penchant for grey and chrome. She’s definitely not staying because of her new business partner’s tight t-shirts, or that perfect face that's inspiring her to pick up her camera again. Soon sparks are flying—and it’s not the faulty wiring. It turns out one percent of Tom’s heart might not be enough for Darcy anymore. This time around, she’s switching things up. She’s going to make Tom Valeska 99 percent hers.

Caoimh on the plot

From just the blurb for 99 Percent Mine the plot had me hooked. The idea of being in love with your twin’s best friend, who was also in construction, had me swooning from page one. I loved the pace of the plot by Sally Thorne, it saw me struggle to put the book down to eat, sleep, move which I always think is a sign of a excellent book. I loved how the plot took the classic alpha male trope and flipped in on its head and instead gave that role to Darcy, who is a major badass can I just say. The only thing I wanted more of in the plot is a more drawn out ending. It felt a little rushed but the bonus epilogue did help my heart when it came to see Darcy and Tom living their blissful relationship on the road flipping houses.

 Iris on the characters

99 Percent Mine was an absolute joy to read. I was pretty pumped when I learned this book is a friends-to-lovers romance AND a second-chance-romance, two things that absolutely DELIGHT my hopelessly romantic heart. Finding out, after having read the book, that the characters have incredibly depth and develop beautifully throughout the story and you have a bestseller in my opinion. What a book!

Darcy’s monologue makes you laugh out loud. She’s intelligent and witty (not to forget that that she enjoys knocking down entitled frat boys a peg or two). She is entirely unapologetic in her ways, which is exactly what makes her such a great character.

Tom is hard-working and so very sweet! Can you just find me my own Tom? I’d be forever happy. I loved Tom and Darcy’s dynamic and the whole opposites attract thing they had going on. I just want MORE!

Lauren on the romance

The romance in 99 Percent Mine was FANTASTIC. It takes the childhood-friends-to-lovers/ brothers-best-friend tropes in an entirely new direction, and I loved it! Darcy has had a crush on Tom for forever, but when he tells her he loves her at 17 she’s just not ready to hear it. A few years go by, a few relationships, a lot of travelling, and suddenly these two are back together and fixing up her grandmother’s house. Watching these two try to navigate a relationship with so much history and so many other people involved was so entertaining. The chemistry between them: off the charts! I loved how well they went together: Tom is Mr. Perfect, and Darcy is Miss Tough Girl, and somehow they work! The banter that these two had, which can only come from years of knowing each other (and the genius mind of Sally Thorne), had me grinning at my book the entire time. And the kisses? So. Much. Chemistry. This romance had everything. My only complaint? I want more of it. Especially Tom, where can I find one?

Justine on her favourite scene

I know there are so many to choose from, and while some readers may disagree, one of my favourite scenes from 99 Percent Mine would have to be the first chapter’s opening scene.

The scene opens up with Darcy Barrett working at a bar, giving her unfiltered inner monologue on the evening unfolding, as she nears the end of her shift. There’s a definite rawness about her which comes through in her assertive, no-nonsense attitude. She enjoys breaking down ‘alpha-males’ with her deadlock stare, and has no problem knocking entitled frat boys down a couple pegs. After getting hit on by said “human Ken doll”, her response to his asking when she gets off work is: “Not for a million years.”

I loved the way this scene introduced us to Darcy’s edgy, albeit sometimes self-destructive nature. Right away, I understood that sarcasm is her default setting, and found her ferocity and sassiness oddly endearing. It definitely set the tone for what to expect from her as the story progressed. A huge applause to Queen Sally Thorne, for once again delivering us a bass-ass leading lady.

  • Plot 95% 95%
  • Romance 100% 100%
  • Characters 100% 100%
Edinburgh in Bloom

Edinburgh in Bloom

Edinburgh in Full Bloom

Cherry blossom season in Edinburgh

Edinburgh in Full Bloom

When I visited Edinburgh a year ago, I was lucky enough to arrive right in the middle of cherry blossom season. Something I wasn’t aware was a thing in Edinburgh, but was a VERY welcome surprise! It will come as no surprise that ever since I moved here in August I have been anxiously awaiting the return of this pink splendour.
March came and went. April came around the corner, but still no cherry blossoms. Then, at the end of April on a very rare hot and sunny day they finally bloomed.

I live right next to The Meadows, one of my favourite parks in Edinburgh, and let it be the case that they completely transform when the cherry blossoms make their appearance. Whenever I walked past it, I did it with the biggest smile on my face. It’s just that pretty a sight. And because I love any excuse to go out and take some pictures, I decided to do a photo series of The Meadows covered in cherry blossoms.

In this post I’ll highlight some of my favourite shots and explain why they’re my favourites. I’ve also added a little gallery at the end so you can flip through the rest of the photo series.

Close up

My favourite part about walking through The Meadows in cherry blossom season is when you look up, all you see is pink. It’s the prettiest sight you can imagine!

I took plenty of close up shots, but this one on the left was one of my favourites because of the way the leaves and the branch frame the blossoms. The background is just unfocused enough to pull your attention to the center of the photo, but provides enough detail to show that there’s cherry blossoms wherever you look.

The Meadows Walkway

The next picture is from The Meadows Walkway. This is the picture I set out to make, because I walk past this point to uni and love it so much. I got up early because this walkway is usually busy with people on their way to work, walking their dog(s), or running. Even though I got there at 7.45AM, there were still plenty of people around. I had to practice my patience a bit and wait for the perfect photo oppurtunity.

A sea of pink

My patience (read: sitting around until the Meadows quieted down a bit) got rewarded with this photo. I’m pretty sure I want to frame this shot. There’s one lone person walking at the end of the walkway. Which is exactly what I was going for, because in the months I’ve lived here I’ve seen The Meadows quiet, but never empty.

I waited a week (or two) for the blossoms to start falling just to get this shot. I love how the fallen blossoms frame the path (and just ALL the blossoms in general).

That’s a wrap. These were my two favourite pictures from the MANY pictures I took. As promised, there’s a photo gallery below with some other outtakes of this photo series. I hope you liked this post! It’s a new thing I’m trying out and I’d love to hear your thoughts on it (and whether you would like more posts like this).

Photo Gallery 

The Girl King by Mimi Yu | Sister Review

The Girl King by Mimi Yu | Sister Review

The Girl King by Mimi Yu

Sister Review
 This review is a combined effort between me and my sister. We read a book and review it by asking each other questions related to the title we are reviewing. The idea is to provide you with two different perspectives.

 This review might contain spoilers! We might discuss any part of the story (sometimes the questions we ask each other might be general, while other times they might touch upon something specific about the ending, etc). If you have not read the book and do not wish for the story to be spoiled you might want to avoid this post!

The Girl King by Mimi Yu | Sister ReviewThe Girl King by Mimi Yu
Series: The Girl King #1
Published by Bloomsbury Publishing on January 8th 2019
Genres: Fantasy & Magic
Pages: 518
Buy on Bol.comBuy on Book Depository
Goodreads
three-stars

Two sisters become unwitting rivals in a war to claim the title of Emperor in this sweeping tale of ambition, sacrifice and betrayal for readers of Sabaa Tahir and Alwyn Hamilton.

All hail the Girl King.

Sisters Lu and Min have always understood their places as princesses of the Empire. Lu knows she is destined to become the dynasty's first female ruler, while Min is resigned to a life in her shadow. Then their father declares their male cousin Set the heir instead—a betrayal that sends the sisters down two very different paths.

Determined to reclaim her birthright, Lu goes on the run. She needs an ally—and an army—if she is to succeed. Her quest leads her to Nokhai, the last surviving wolf shapeshifter. Nok wants to keep his identity secret, but finds himself forced into an uneasy alliance with the girl whose family killed everyone he ever loved…

Alone in the volatile court, Min's hidden power awakens—a forbidden, deadly magic that could secure Set's reign…or allow Min to claim the throne herself. But there can only be one Emperor, and the sisters' greatest enemy could turn out to be each other.

 Iris asks Merel:

As pumped as I was for this book, it took me quite some time to get into the story. Did you experience the same? 

Yes, I did! I thought the book had a lot of potential, but I had quite a hard time getting into the story, so that was too bad. It also took me a lot time to get invested in the story. When I put the book down because I had something else to do, I never really felt the urge to pick up the book again.  

The Girl King has three main characters, characters that I found hard to connect with. Part of it might have to do with the fact that it’s written in third person POV. What are your thoughts on this? 

I also had a hard time connecting with the main characters. They felt distant to me, and reading about their stories made me feel rather detached. However, I don’t think it was the third person perspective, since many authors use it. Sarah J. Maas wrote her books in 3rd person POV and I most certainly did not have any trouble getting in to her books, or relating to her characters. I think for The Girl King  it had more to do with the writing style, which wasn’t bad, but it just wasn’t my cup of tea.

What did you think of the Asian elements in the story? Did any stand out to you and/or what’s your favourite element? 

I really liked the idea of it, since there are a lot of myths and legends in Asian culture/history that I’m not familiar with, so an Asian inspired fantasy sounded really interesting! I liked the elements that could be found throughout the novel, and I think it’s cool that she used those. I really liked the concept of the Kith in the story, and how there were all these different tribes. I loved finding out that the empire of the first flame used to have gifted Kith as well, namely the tiger, but that  they lost the ability somehow. I think the storyline of the Kith made the book quite interesting.  

The Girl King is another book in a (pretty long) line up of strong female heroine centred YA books. I think we can agree we both love a kickass heroine, where does this book rate in this line up? 

Oh, I suck at these questions!  For this one, I’ll be going with Lu, since I didn’t like Min very much to be honest… She annoyed me quite a lot. Lu is a badass! Not only is she good with a sword, she also has a sense of responsibility and loyalty. Moreover, I loved how she learned from her mistakes and the encounters she had. She did not blindly stick to her beliefs that her kingdom had been blameless in some of the darker, more ruthless events in the past. Once she learned the truth, she accepted it and learned to live with it, instead of denying it and insisting that the others were wrong.  

In my opinion, Lu is pretty cool. Not just a badass, but also  genuinely a good person. So, she ranks pretty high as a person! It’s just a bit harder to think of her when people ask me for some great heroines, since the book did not capture my full attention.  

I liked how impulsive actions had consequences in the story, which leads to Lu to learn from her mistakes and confront her biases. What do you think about this?  

It always feels good when you read about a character that learns from her mistakes and past, and Lu certainly learned a lot about herself during her journey. Not just Lu though, Nokhai also discovered a whole lot more about himself. I liked how they both developed throughout the story and became bigger than when they started. They learned truths about themselves, the other and the world. 

All and all this book was a bit ‘meh’ for me. Tell me what was your favourite thing about The Girl King and what was your least favourite thing? 

I know what you feel, since I pretty much felt the same. I was really excited for this release, and it felt a bit like a let-down. Which is too bad, because the concept wasn’t bad! And while answering your questions, I also realised that both Lu and Nokhai’s characters were quite well developed, yet still it wasn’t what I had hoped for.  

As I already mentioned above, I loved the concepted of the gifted Kith with it’s different tribes and how she spun this part of the story. I thought it was really interesting and original! (Which is probably why I liked reading about Nokhai most haha.)

My least favourite thing… Honestly, I really disliked how Min evolved in the story. I get that she and Lu were totally different people, and that that was the reason for their strained relationship, but I felt like Min didn’t try a lot. She acted self-absorbed, constantly felt sorry for herself and everything she had to endure, and remained ignorant of everything else. And look at the consequences of her actions… I think I had a hard time accepting that in the end, she dropped her sister ruthlessly, just so she could get what she thought she wanted. She did not think about her sister, or the rest of the world.  So yeah, I didn’t enjoy reading about Min, even though I was quite interested to read about her learning to use her powers. Even when her magic had awakened, she still let other people use her (and her powers). 

Merel asks Iris:

What did you think about the setting? 

I thought the setting was really interesting. When I first heard about this book and found out it was high-fantasy, revolved around two sisters, and Asian inspired I was instantly hooked. In fact, the setting was one of the things about The Girl King that I did really enjoy. I think the Asian setting was really cool and the magic system was really interesting.

Which storyline did you enjoy the most? Which did you like the least? 

I think this was my biggest struggle in The Girl King. There are three third-person perspectives, that of Lu, her sister Min, and Nok. I found about halfway through that I didn’t particularly love any of them. I liked Nok and thought his storyline was interesting, but he felt a bit interchangable with most YA fantasy love interests. Lu was badass, yes, but she too felt really similar to many other YA fantasy heroines. And Min… she annoyed me to no end with her endless naivete and self-pity.

All in all, I definitely enjoyed Lu and Nok’s storylines the most. Min’s story line was without a doubt my least favourite.

What did you think about character development in The Girl King? 

(I am not going to talk about Min here, sorry, but she frustrated me too much).

Similar to what you mentioned previously I really liked how Lu and Nok grew and learned from their mistakes. They discovered who they were as a person, what they stood for, and faced truths about themselves and the world they lived in. I might not have loved the characters, but I do see that they underwent change and defintely came out for the better!

What did you think about the writing style of the book? 

I don’t know. I felt disconnected from the story from the very beginning. It might have had to do with the characters, whom I didn’t really love, or the writing style. Or it might be a combination of the two. What I do know is that the writing didn’t suck me into the story and, especially in the beginning, had to force myself to keep reading.

Usually the male character is the strong and protective one. In Lu and Nokhai’s case the roles were reversed: Lu was the protective one. She was good with a sword and saved Nokhai multiple times. What’s your opinion on this? 

This was quite interesting and quite a nice contrast between the two. Nok was’t a warrior, at all. I think this had to do with the destruction and trauma in his past that left him scarred. Especially compared to Lu, he was quite unsure of all that was to come.

It’s quite an interesting contrast, really. (I hadn’t actually thought about it until you mentioned it).

I don’t tend to have a hard time getting into a new world when reading a fantasy book, as I mostly seem to fall right in. However, this time it took me longer, and I really had to make an effort. Can you relate to this? 

Unfortunately, yes… It took about a 100 pages for me to get invested into the story. If it hadn’t been a Sister Review book I might have actually put it down and stopped reading. I don’t think it had to do with the fact The Girl King is a fantasy book. As I mentioned before, I think it largely had to do with my inability to connect with the characters and the writing style.

Finally, will you read the next instalment in this series, which comes out February 2020? 

I have to think about this. I might pick it up to see if it grabs my attention and to find out whether the sequel is better than the first book. However, right now I’m not really interested in reading the sequel.

  • Plot 60% 60%
  • Setting 80% 80%
  • Writing style 50% 50%
  • Characters 40% 40%
The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | Sister Review

The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | Sister Review

The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson

Sister Review
 This review is a combined effort between me and my sister. We read a book and review it by asking each other questions related to the title we are reviewing. The idea is to provide you with two different perspectives.

 This review might contain spoilers! We might discuss any part of the story (sometimes the questions we ask each other might be general, while other times they might touch upon something specific about the ending, etc). If you have not read the book and do not wish for the story to be spoiled you might want to avoid this post!

The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | Sister ReviewThe Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on May 3rd 2016
Genres: Contemporary
Pages: 519
Format: Hardcover
Buy on Bol.comBuy on Book Depository
Goodreads
three-half-stars

Andie had it all planned out. When you are a politician’s daughter who’s pretty much raised yourself, you learn everything can be planned or spun, or both. Especially your future. Important internship? Check. Amazing friends? Check. Guys? Check (as long as we’re talking no more than three weeks).

But that was before the scandal. Before having to be in the same house with her dad. Before walking an insane number of dogs. That was before Clark and those few months that might change her whole life. Because here’s the thing—if everything’s planned out, you can never find the unexpected. And where’s the fun in that?

 Iris asks Merel:

 Of all the Morgan Matson books you’ve read so far, where does The Unexpected Everything rank? 

 Good question! My favourite book of hers is Save the Date, and Since You’ve Been Gone is my number two. To me, The Unexpected Everything and Second Chance Summer are about at the same level. With both books I had some difficulty identifying with the main character at first, which made it harder to get in to the book. Both are good stories, but I didn’t enjoy it as much as Save the Date, which I loved and made me laugh out loud a lot!

What did you think of the relationship between Andie and her father, or more specifically how it develops over time?

Andie and her dad have a very complex relationship, partly because both of them have such a hard time talking about their feelings. I don’t think it’s weird that their relationship was so strained at the beginning. They had lived different lives, pretty much all the time apart from each other, for the last five years. But both of them had played a part in that. Neither of them ever mentioned how they felt which made them drift apart and practically become strangers.

 I do get that Andie had a hard time adjusting after her father got home and started ‘being a dad’ since she had been living without him for the last five years.  I  enjoyed the fact that they started spending more time with each other throughout the book: doing it on their own terms, trying to build their relationship. In the end they got to a good place, and I did think that it was written in a realistic way: their relationship wasn’t perfect all of a sudden, they both had to put time and effort in it.

Clark has to be one of my favourite book boyfriends of all time. How do you rate Clark on the book boyfriend scale?

He was pretty amazing! I really liked the detail of him being a bestselling author himself. Oh, the rating part is difficult though… I kind of have different lists, haha. But to me, Clark reminded me of Levi from “Fangirl”, so that means he did really well!

One of my favourite things about this book is the fact that it is all about friendship. What did you think about Andie’s friendship with Palmer, Toby and Bri (you MUST mention the scavenger hunt here)?

Palmer: I think Palmer was the most evened out of the group. Out of all four she usually made the most grown-up decisions. I liked her a lot, she was a great friend and I loved how she set up a scavenger hunt and how invested she was in it. I think we can both relate to that part, haha. Therefore, I also understood her disappointment when Bri showed up empty-handed (for reasons I’m pretty sure we both guessed right then before the big secret came out…)

Toby: Toby was a great girl with a lot of insecurities. I think she had a hard time living under Bri’s shadow, but she also enjoyed it, because that way not all the attention would be on her. I think it was a good thing that she and Bri spent some time apart. This way she had time to figure out who she is and what she thinks is important in life.

Bri:  I have to admit that of all friends, Bri I remembered least about. It took me a bit of time to have it come back to me. I think that, just like Toby, Bri experienced some of the negative parts of having such a close friendship – to the point that they can’t even keep you apart. She always tried to think of Toby first, so it was a good thing for her as well that they got separated for a while. She totally handled the guy situation wrong, but I do understand how she felt. Oh! And I have to say, if you name your cat Mr. Cupcakes, you should expect an evil feline… I don’t think any feline would appreciate that name, haha.

Topher: In a way Topher wasn’t a friend, and in a way he was. He helped her a lot when her dad started doing his work, and in the end you do learn that he liked Andie more than he let on. But his personality throughout the story wasn’t one that made me like him a lot. He wasn’t a bad guy, but I wasn’t rooting for him either. Quite some times I got a bit annoyed when he was mentioned, but that had more to do with the fact that I disagreed with Andie’s decisions than with him.

Clark: I’m totally going to use this moment to gush about Clark, because they were friends first! I liked Clark.. A lot! His awkwardness and nerves made him so human. I think his character was well rounded since he also had his flaws (I mean the killing Majorie and .. part, that was harsh!),  but he also compensated for them and he had a huge heart. I totally loved the part where he found out that Andie didn’t read: “Wait, I’m sorry, but how do you not read books? Like-what do you do on planes?”  This made made me laugh, because for a fellow bookworm, this is such a relatable moment!

I don’t mind long books, but I felt like the plot was a bit all over the place, especially near the end. What did you think of the plot?

I think at the beginning the storyline was quite clear: the scandal with her dad led to Andie losing her carefully made plans, which led to her having to unexpectedly (see what I did there?) figure out something new. By starting the job as dog walker she met Clark and learned new things about herself so she could grow. I could see all the different drama’s coming from a mile away, so it’s not like they were randomly thrown together, but I do understand what you mean. It wasn’t just drama with her dad, or her friends, or with Clark. We got all three of them tangled up in each other. In a way this could resemble certain teenage moments, but it did lead to the story being all over the place.

Merel asks Iris:

When it comes to Morgan Matson’s books there are two possible scenarios for me: either I get pulled right in or the first 100-150 pages are a bit of a struggle and then I’ll enjoy it. Can you relate to this? If so, in which scenario did The Unexpected Everything fit for you?

I can 100% relate! I almost always end up loving Morgan Matson’s books, but sometimes I find it a bit hard to fully get into the story. This was the case for The Unexpected Everything. It took me a bit longer to get into the story, which is the complete opposite of my experience reading Save the Date. A little further into the story I did manage to get into it and I definitely enjoyed the book, just not as much as Save the Date.

As we know, European and American teen life can be quite different. How do you feel about this? Do you think this made it harder for us to relate to Andie?

I feel like the whole senator’s daughter ‘thing’ was a bit hard to relate to. However, that mainly because that’s just so far removed from what is known to me. Aside from that I didn’t have a whole lot of trouble relating to Andie. I could relate to how much the story revolved around friendship. It was, however, a bit hard to relate to how focused she was on making sure there was no gap on her CV. The university system is just very different in the Netherlands. I feel like we’re more focussed on just enjoying summer instead of finding an impressive job for your CV.

What did you think of the storyline? Do you think it was realistic? 

The plot felt a little bit all over the place. There was a lot going on all at once. Where the story was quite slow, the end felt VERY rushed to me. In a way, this is what made realistic as well, though. (I realise that sounds a bit ‘all over the place’ as well…) It did somehow work: The Unexpected Everything was enjoyable (even if the plot felt a bit messy to me).

What did you like most about The Unexpected Everything and what was your biggest dislike? Who was your favourite character and which character did you dislike the most?

You do realise this is four questions all disguised into one? CHEATER! I LOVED the role friendship played in the story. I love a good friendship heavy story and The Unexpected Everything definitely delivered! THAT SCAVENGER HUNT WAS EVERYTHING! My biggest dislike was probably the ending, which I won’t spoil, but felt a bit rushed. I feel like Clark is what book boyfriends are made of and he is definitely one of my favourite characters! My least favourite… Well, if you’re allowed to cheat with the amount of questions you ask, I’m allowed as well. I can’t think of anyone I truly disliked!

Morgan Matson is an amazing YA Contemporary/Coming of Age writer. Are there any authors you would recommend to dans of Morgan Matson?

YES! Jennifer Armentrout, Rainbow Rowell, Becky Albertalli, Adam Silvera, and MANY MORE. There are so many talented contemporary authors, but these are definitely some of my favourites.

  • Plot 60% 60%
  • Characters 90% 90%