The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | Sister Review

The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | Sister Review

Photo credit: Sarah, Strikes of Luck

This review is a combined effort between me and my sister. We read a book and review it by asking each other questions related to the title we are reviewing. The idea is to provide you with two different perspectives.

This review might contain spoilers! We might discuss any part of the story (sometimes the questions we ask each other might be general, while other times they might touch upon something specific about the ending, etc). If you have not read the book and do not wish for the story to be spoiled you might want to avoid this post!

The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson | Sister ReviewThe Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on May 3rd 2016
Genres: Contemporary
Pages: 519
Format: Hardcover
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Goodreads
three-half-stars

Andie had it all planned out. When you are a politician’s daughter who’s pretty much raised yourself, you learn everything can be planned or spun, or both. Especially your future. Important internship? Check. Amazing friends? Check. Guys? Check (as long as we’re talking no more than three weeks).

But that was before the scandal. Before having to be in the same house with her dad. Before walking an insane number of dogs. That was before Clark and those few months that might change her whole life. Because here’s the thing—if everything’s planned out, you can never find the unexpected. And where’s the fun in that?

Iris asks Merel: 

Of all the Morgan Matson books you’ve read so far, where does The Unexpected Everything rank? 

Good question! My favourite book of hers is Save the Date, and Since You’ve Been Gone is my number two. To me, The Unexpected Everything and Second Chance Summer are about at the same level. With both books I had some difficulty identifying with the main character at first, which made it harder to get in to the book. Both are good stories, but I didn’t enjoy it as much as Save the Date, which I loved and made me laugh out loud a lot!

What did you think of the relationship between Andie and her father, or more specifically how it develops over time?

Andie and her dad have a very complex relationship, partly because both of them have such a hard time talking about their feelings. I don’t think it’s weird that their relationship was so strained at the beginning. They had lived different lives, pretty much all the time apart from each other, for the last five years. But both of them had played a part in that. Neither of them ever mentioned how they felt which made them drift apart and practically become strangers. 

I do get that Andie had a hard time adjusting after her father got home and started ‘being a dad’ since she had been living without him for the last five years.  I  enjoyed the fact that they started spending more time with each other throughout the book: doing it on their own terms, trying to build their relationship. In the end they got to a good place, and I did think that it was written in a realistic way: their relationship wasn’t perfect all of a sudden, they both had to put time and effort in it. 

Clark has to be one of my favourite book boyfriends of all time. How do you rate Clark on the book boyfriend scale?

He was pretty amazing! I really liked the detail of him being a bestselling author himself. Oh, the rating part is difficult though… I kind of have different lists, haha. But to me, Clark reminded me of Levi from “Fangirl”, so that means he did really well! 

One of my favourite things about this book is the fact that it is all about friendship. What did you think about Andie’s friendship with Palmer, Toby and Bri (you MUST mention the scavenger hunt here)?

Palmer: I think Palmer was the most evened out of the group. Out of all four she usually made the most grown-up decisions. I liked her a lot, she was a great friend and I loved how she set up a scavenger hunt and how invested she was in it. I think we can both relate to that part, haha. Therefore, I also understood her disappointment when Bri showed up empty-handed (for reasons I’m pretty sure we both guessed right then before the big secret came out…)

Toby: Toby was a great girl with a lot of insecurities. I think she had a hard time living under Bri’s shadow, but she also enjoyed it, because that way not all the attention would be on her. I think it was a good thing that she and Bri spent some time apart. This way she had time to figure out who she is and what she thinks is important in life.  

Bri:  I have to admit that of all friends, Bri I remembered least about. It took me a bit of time to have it come back to me. I think that, just like Toby, Bri experienced some of the negative parts of having such a close friendship – to the point that they can’t even keep you apart. She always tried to think of Toby first, so it was a good thing for her as well that they got separated for a while. She totally handled the guy situation wrong, but I do understand how she felt. Oh! And I have to say, if you name your cat Mr. Cupcakes, you should expect an evil feline… I don’t think any feline would appreciate that name, haha.

Topher: In a way Topher wasn’t a friend, and in a way he was. He helped her a lot when her dad started doing his work, and in the end you do learn that he liked Andie more than he let on. But his personality throughout the story wasn’t one that made me like him a lot. He wasn’t a bad guy, but I wasn’t rooting for him either. Quite some times I got a bit annoyed when he was mentioned, but that had more to do with the fact that I disagreed with Andie’s decisions than with him. 

Clark: I’m totally going to use this moment to gush about Clark, because they were friends first! I liked Clark.. A lot! His awkwardness and nerves made him so human. I think his character was well rounded since he also had his flaws (I mean the killing Majorie and .. part, that was harsh!),  but he also compensated for them and he had a huge heart. I totally loved the part where he found out that Andie didn’t read: “Wait, I’m sorry, but how do you not read books? Like-what do you do on planes?”  This made made me laugh, because for a fellow bookworm, this is such a relatable moment!  

I don’t mind long books, but I felt like the plot was a bit all over the place, especially near the end. What did you think of the plot?

I think at the beginning the storyline was quite clear: the scandal with her dad led to Andie losing her carefully made plans, which led to her having to unexpectedly (see what I did there?) figure out something new. By starting the job as dog walker she met Clark and learned new things about herself so she could grow. I could see all the different drama’s coming from a mile away, so it’s not like they were randomly thrown together, but I do understand what you mean. It wasn’t just drama with her dad, or her friends, or with Clark. We got all three of them tangled up in each other. In a way this could resemble certain teenage moments, but it did lead to the story being all over the place.

Merel asks Iris: 

When it comes to Morgan Matson’s books there are two possible scenarios for me: either I get pulled right in or the first 100-150 pages are a bit of a struggle and then I’ll enjoy it. Can you relate to this? If so, in which scenario did The Unexpected Everything fit for you?

I can 100% relate! I almost always end up loving Morgan Matson’s books, but sometimes I find it a bit hard to fully get into the story. This was the case for The Unexpected Everything. It took me a bit longer to get into the story, which is the complete opposite of my experience reading Save the Date. A little further into the story I did manage to get into it and I definitely enjoyed the book, just not as much as Save the Date

As we know, European and American teen life can be quite different. How do you feel about this? Do you think this made it harder for us to relate to Andie?

I feel like the whole senator’s daughter ‘thing’ was a bit hard to relate to. However, that mainly because that’s just so far removed from what is known to me. Aside from that I didn’t have a whole lot of trouble relating to Andie. I could relate to how much the story revolved around friendship. It was, however, a bit hard to relate to how focused she was on making sure there was no gap on her CV. The university system is just very different in the Netherlands. I feel like we’re more focussed on just enjoying summer instead of finding an impressive job for your CV.

What did you think of the storyline? Do you think it was realistic? 

The plot felt a little bit all over the place. There was a lot going on all at once. Where the story was quite slow, the end felt VERY rushed to me. In a way, this is what made realistic as well, though. (I realise that sounds a bit ‘all over the place’ as well…) It did somehow work: The Unexpected Everything was enjoyable (even if the plot felt a bit messy to me).

What did you like most about The Unexpected Everything and what was your biggest dislike? Who was your favourite character and which character did you dislike the most?

You do realise this is four questions all disguised into one? CHEATER! I LOVED the role friendship played in the story. I love a good friendship heavy story and The Unexpected Everything definitely delivered! THAT SCAVENGER HUNT WAS EVERYTHING! My biggest dislike was probably the ending, which I won’t spoil, but felt a bit rushed. I feel like Clark is what book boyfriends are made of and he is definitely one of my favourite characters! My least favourite… Well, if you’re allowed to cheat with the amount of questions you ask, I’m allowed as well. I can’t think of anyone I truly disliked!

Morgan Matson is an amazing YA Contemporary/Coming of Age writer. Are there any authors you would recommend to dans of Morgan Matson? 

YES! Jennifer Armentrout, Rainbow Rowell, Becky Albertalli, Adam Silvera, and MANY MORE. There are so many talented contemporary authors, but these are definitely some of my favourites.

three-half-stars
The Darkest Star by Jennifer Armentrout | Sister Review

The Darkest Star by Jennifer Armentrout | Sister Review

This review is a combined effort between me and my sister. We read a book and review it by asking each other questions related to the title we are reviewing. The idea is to provide you with two different perspectives.

This review might contain spoilers! We might discuss any part of the story (sometimes the questions we ask each other might be general, while other times they might touch upon something specific about the ending, etc). If you have not read the book and do not wish for the story to be spoiled you might want to avoid this post!

The Darkest Star by Jennifer Armentrout | Sister ReviewThe Darkest Star Series: Origin #1
Published by Tor Teen on October 30th 2018
Genres: Paranormal
Pages: 368
Format: Hardcover
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four-stars

When seventeen-year-old Evie Dasher is caught up in a raid at a notorious club known as one of the few places where humans and the surviving Luxen can mingle freely, she meets Luc, an unnaturally beautiful guy she initially assumes is a Luxen...but he is, in fact, something much more powerful. Her growing attraction for Luc will lead her deeper and deeper into a world she'd only heard about, a world where everything she thought she knew will be turned on its head...

Iris asks Merel

It’s been quite some time since we last set foot in the world of the Lux. Did you need a refresher on all that had happened in the original series or did you have no problems jumping back in? 

I did not reread the books before starting TDS, and I found that it wasn’t really necessary to do so. Even though this series is a continuation of The Lux series, I think you could read it without having read the previous books, you just wouldn’t understand some references and jokes. Had I had the time, I totally would’ve reread the entire series! I did have to think about certain things every now and then, but in the end, it all fell into place and the story came rushing back quickly!

The anticipation of a new book set in this world was quite nerve-wracking, did The Darkest Star live up to your expectations? 

I tried very hard not to have any expectations (though that was rather hard, especially with all the teasers leading up to the release!) since I loved the Lux series. I think Armentrout did a great job. She didn’t try to turn The Darkest Star in a Lux series 2.0. The characters were all their own, as was the storyline. I loved how some of the characters made their returns, and I think they might play a bigger role in the books to come.  I think Armentrout did a great job writing The Darkest Star. The book made me laugh out loud a lot, the story was realistic following the earlier books, it was action-packed and the characters were realistically flawed as much as they are lovable!

There is quite some time between the Lux series and The Darkest Star being published, looking at the two of them together do you feel there is a difference between the two (e.g. writing style)?  

There is! I have to admit that it’s been a while since I’ve read the Lux series. (I feel a reread coming up!) But what I do remember is that Jennifer Armentrout has a certain way with her dialogue. She did this as well in The Darkest Star. The main characters are different people with different personalities, but the bickering and humour is ever present! The books are probably not written in the exact same writing style since I feel like she grew and changed as a writer, but this didn’t bother me. It’s not like the two series don’t fit into each other.

Jennifer Armentrout’s books always tend to make me laugh because there’s so many funny scenes and great dialogue present. What scene made you laugh? 

Oh, this question is impossible to answer! There were a lot of moments that made me laugh out loud, which you know because we’ve talked/skyped/facetimed/texted about it quite a lot! But for me to have to choose one particular scene… that’s impossible! All I could say to other people is: Read this series, because it will brighten your day and make you laugh out loud! Not to mention, you’ll find yourself with another book boyfriend, haha.

There’s quite some contrast between the way the Lux live in the first books (in secrecy) and the way they live/are being treated in The Darkest Star. How did you perceive this?  

I think The Darkest Star was realistic in the way this changed. In book four of The Lux series the apocalypse pretty much started, and after what happened at the end of book four and in the final installment of the series, it wouldn’t have been realistic had people just continued as if nothing had happened. Even though the way of living for the Luxen changed in one way, it did not change that much in another. Sure, they no longer have to pretend to be human and try to blend in. However, in this new reality, they still aren’t free to be themselves and to roam as they wish. The Luxen are forced to register and wear disablers so they lose their powers. Moreover, as the story continues you learn how the tension keeps getting worse, and how there is even talk about “Luxen only communities” in order to separate the humans and Luxen at all. And I think we all know what happens once you start putting different groups in ‘communities or reservations’ separated from each other…

Merel asks Iris

So, another Jennifer Armentrout book! The Darkest Star reconnects us with a world we were already familiar with, the one from the Lux series. Did it live up to your expectations?

Yes! It most definitely lived up to my expectations in the way that every book by Jennifer Armentrout does. It was great fun to read and I felt that it was so easy to dive back into the world of the Lux. Though I very much enjoyed this book, I do have to admit that I loved it less than I thought I would. This had nothing to do with the quality of the book (this was superb as always), but rather with the characters they concerned. I like Luc and Evie and I think they’re great characters, but I might just love Katy and Daemon slightly more.

What was (were) your favourite part(s) of the book? 

I think my favourite parts where the nudges towards the earlier books and how The Darkest Star builds onwards from all that happened in the Lux series. What I loved just as much is that even though these earlier events from the other books matter, Luc and Evie’s story stands on its own as well.

What did you think of the main characters? 

Smart-assed, witty and a lot of heart. Honestly, what’s not to like?

One of my favourite parts of Jennifer’s book is the dialogue. What’s your opinion about this? 

Jennifer Armentrout definitely has a way with dialogue that is witty and a lot of fun to read. The Darkest Star is no exception! The dialogue plays a huge role in what makes these books so attractive. It truly wouldn’t be the part of the Lux series if the dialogue wasn’t on point (and it really was!).

TDS takes place four years after the last Lux novel. Do you think the setting and issues in the book are realistic? 

I think the way The Darkest Star unfolds builds very logically and realistically upon earlier events in from the world of the Lux series. It continues exploring certain themes and events introduced in the earlier books, but also brings into play new issues that fit the course of the new story and add to series as a whole.

Lastly, since we both pre-ordered the book, we received a bonus scene. What did you think of that?

Do not hurt me for this… I have, unfortunately, yet to read the bonus scene. Even worse is that I can’t seem to find the bonus scene anywhere in my mailbox, so it appears I have to take a raincheck on this question (and beg you to forward it to me…).

four-stars
Reign the Earth by A. C. Gaughen | Book Review

Reign the Earth by A. C. Gaughen | Book Review

Reign the Earth by A. C. Gaughen | Book ReviewReign the Earth by A.C. Gaughen
Series: The Elementae #1
Published by Bloomsbury Publishing on January 30th 2018
Genres: Fantasy & Magic
Pages: 438
Format: Hardcover
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five-stars




Shalia is a proud daughter of the desert, but after years of devastating war with the adjoining kingdom, her people are desperate for peace. Willing to trade her freedom to ensure the safety of her family, Shalia becomes Queen of the Bonelands.

But she soon learns that her husband, Calix, is motivated only by his desire to exterminate the Elementae—mystical people who can control earth, wind, air, and fire. Even more unsettling are Shalia’s feelings for her husband’s brother, which unleash a power over the earth she never knew she possessed—a power that could get her killed. As rumors of a rebellion against Calix spread, Shalia must choose between the last chance for peace and her own future as an Elementae.

Reign the Earth is such a richly spun tale full of amazingness that I am having trouble forming cohesive sentences about it, let alone write a full review. However, I decided that I am going to try because I want nothing more than to persuade you to read this book as well. I want to see this book on your shelves, your TBRs, and in your lives, period.

Why you need to read Reign the Earth

The main character, Shalia, is fiercely loyal and brave. She is such a selfless individual who, when faced with tough decisions, isn’t above doing everything in her powers to do the right thing. I loved getting to know her and seeing how she tackled the struggles that came her way (and believe me, there are plenty). Her story isn’t always easy to take. Especially her marriage with Callix and their relationship was very hard to read about. There is a very thin line that Shalia is walking and the smallest mishap could destroy all that she’d sacrificed.

The very best thing about Reign the Earth though is its setting and the variety of cultures. The worldbuilding was so well executed and an absolute joy to read about!

And if that isn’t enough, it all builds up to a finale that will give you feels aplenty! It’s devastating, it’s powerful, and it’s everything you want from such a powerhouse of a book.

Reign the Earth is a well-crafted and BEAUTIFUL book! If all things mentioned above won’t sway you to read it, then I have one last trick up my sleeve:  the cover alone is enough reason to pick Reign the Earth up. I am not above saying that if you occasionally fall prey to buying books for the cover, let Reign the Earth be one of them. I promise you that you will not regret it.

five-stars
Sky in the Deep by Adrienne Young | Book Review

Sky in the Deep by Adrienne Young | Book Review

Sky in the Deep by Adrienne Young | Book ReviewSky in the Deep by Adrienne Young
Published by Wednesday Books on April 24th 2018
Genres: Action & Adventure, Historical Fiction
Pages: 352
Format: Hardcover
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five-stars




OND ELDR. BREATHE FIRE.

Raised to be a warrior, seventeen-year-old Eelyn fights alongside her Aska clansmen in an ancient rivalry against the Riki clan. Her life is brutal but simple: fight and survive. Until the day she sees the impossible on the battlefield — her brother, fighting with the enemy — the brother she watched die five years ago.

Faced with her brother's betrayal, she must survive the winter in the mountains with the Riki, in a village where every neighbor is an enemy, every battle scar possibly one she delivered. But when the Riki village is raided by a ruthless clan thought to be a legend, Eelyn is even more desperate to get back to her beloved family.

She is given no choice but to trust Fiske, her brother’s friend, who sees her as a threat. They must do the impossible: unite the clans to fight together, or risk being slaughtered one by one. Driven by a love for her clan and her growing love for Fiske, Eelyn must confront her own definition of loyalty and family while daring to put her faith in the people she’s spent her life hating.

I am always up for a good and solid Viking type of story! As a part of my studies revolved around studying their culture, I always find it hard to fall in love with these type of books because so many stories don’t really do their culture justice. Lucky for me (and you!) Sky in the Deep delivered, and how!

If you are not into lots of action and (some) gore, this book might not be for you. It is fast paced and action packed from the start, as you’re immediately thrown into a battle between two rival clans. And, for the rest of the story, that fast paced and action-packed vibe doesn’t let up! (Yay!)

Eelyn, the main character in Sky in the Deep, is hard and tough, not because circumstances forced her to be, but just because she is. And guys, you wouldn’t believe how refreshing that is! She develops a lot throughout the story as the foundation of everything she’s always believed in is shaken. She has to rediscover her place in her world and accept that maybe not everything is as black and white as she previously believed to be.

The romance, guys, is a slow burner! (Que fist pump!) I love me a good slow-burner, and THIS BOOK HAS IT! It is so good, it is forbidden, and it is intense. What isn’t to like?

Another thing I really enjoyed is that Sky in the Deep dives into the subject of what makes a family. The concept of which is something Eelyn redefines as she changes throughout the story. View Spoiler » It is all about who you let into your heart. Eelyn might be a badass, but you cannot deny that she has heart!

Fast paced and action-packed until the end! If you love the former and you don’t mind (some) gore, then Sky in the Deep is for you! For all the Viking-type-of-story fans out there: I can’t recommend this book enough!

five-stars
An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson | Book Review

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson | Book Review

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson | Book ReviewAn Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson
Published by Margaret K. McElderry Books on September 26th 2017
Genres: Fantasy & Magic
Pages: 300
Format: Hardcover
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four-half-stars




A skilled painter must stand up to the ancient power of the faerie courts—even as she falls in love with a faerie prince—in this gorgeous debut novel.

Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes—a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love—and that love violates the fair folks’ ruthless laws. Now both of their lives are forfeit, unless Isobel can use her skill as an artist to fight the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.

Hello precious, and welcome to my top ten of favorite books this year! An Enchantment of Ravens was SUCH a beautiful book to read: gorgeous writing, wonderful characters, and a great plot. Honestly, I felt kinda desperate when I finished the book and realized it was a standalone novel because if there was more I would have jumped at the chance to dive into this world again.

If you’re a fan of fairy folklore, An Enchantment of Ravens is THE book for you. The story reminds me so much of traditional folklore and holds true to traditional aspects. At the same time, it is so incredibly unique and unlike anything I’ve read before. The various aspects of the story just work so well together; there’s humor, adventure, and lots of traveling. It’s wonderful!

The writing, guys… Margaret Rogerson is BORN to write. Her prose is so expertly crafted. It is creative and imaginative and I can’t wait to read more of her work. The world-building might have been a little on the underdeveloped side, but I found that I didn’t really care as much because the story was just so well-done.

One of my favorite (and main) aspects of the book is the whole concept of crafts; cooking, writing, painting, and so on. Isobel, our protagonist, paints for the faerie folk, who obsessively collect any crafts because they are unable to create any themselves. Then one day, out of the blue, a faerie prince shows up to have his portrait done and THE REST YOU’LL HAVE TO READ FOR YOURSELF. The whole concept is just so freaking awesome and well thought out.

You want to read An Enchantment of Ravens! It is such a gem to read and if you love faerie folklore or fantasy you won’t want to miss this. It is beautifully written and is so original you won’t want to stop reading until it’s finished -and then you’ll want more!

four-half-stars